Graham restoration

Subtitle

Members Area

Recent Blog Entries

Recent Photos

Newest Members

              TEMPERATURE GUAGE

         King Seeley made the temperature gauge. The sending unit that is in the cylinder head is the same unit used in flat head Ford V8s in the '40s and early '50s. There are used units around but they were available from Ford obsolete sources.

        

              MARVEL SCHEIBLER CARBURETOR

         If you have trouble with your carburetor and it can't be rebuilt or you want something that works, try an after market unit made by Tillotson. The model number is YR-2 and originally was boxed with several adapter arms and has a stub shaft that mates up with the Graham linkage. The adjustable main jet is adjusted by turning it in until it seats and then turn it back out one and a half turns. Then start the car adjust the jet both ways until the engine starts running rough and then make the setting half way between the two positions.

        

              FUEL GAUGES

         The fuel gauge is made by King Seeley, and uses a different type of sender unit. The gauge has a bi-metal strip with resistance wire around it and as the current increases the heat increases and it bends the bi-metal strip causing the needle to move. The sender unit also uses a bi-metal strip with resistance wire around it. The float moves and applies pressure to a contact and heats the strip. The strip then moves away from the contact and when the strip cools down the contacts are again closed. The longer the time the contacts are apart the less voltage is sent to the gauge. Increasing or decreasing the voltage makes the gauge move. This sender unit is a vibrating unit rather then a variable resistance sender, and care must be used when checking for problems in the system.

              Trouble shooting the system

         First check to make sure the battery is hooked up with battery positive to the frame of the car, and battery negative is hooked to the starter. Then check for voltage at the fuel gauge. One post of the fuel gauge should have full battery voltage; the other side should have a different voltage reading. Check for voltage at the sender unit at the tank, and it should be the same as the reading taken on the post with the reading that was different than full battery voltage. If you don't have any voltage at the tank and you do at the gauge the wire is bad. If you have battery voltage coming to the gauge but not out of the gauge then the gauge is bad. If you have voltage at the tank and the gauge does not move try grounding the wire to the frame to see if the gauge moves. Caution; do not leave the wire hooked to the frame for very long, damage could occur to the gauge. If the gauge moves the sending unit is bad. Original units are hard to find, the King Seeley number for the '38 & '39 Graham is #6928 and for the '40 Graham is #7916. The '36 to '40 Ford used a similar setup and you can check with Bob Drake Ford Parts, 1819 N.W. Washington Blvd., Grants Pass, Oregon 97526, phone 1-800-221-3673. The float arm might have to be shortened, no guarantee it will work.

 

 

Clutch; Semi-Centrifugal by Long, molded facing 6" ID, 9 1/2 " OD, 1/8"thick

Transmission by Warner, Synchromeshed helical gears

Gear ratio; rear axle 4.27, second 1.55, low 2.57, reverse 3.48

Rear axle by Spicer, semi-floating, gearing Hypoid 47/11

Tires; 6.00 x 16, 6.25 x 16, option later 6.50 x16, all were 4 ply.

Springs; Semi-elliptic by Detroit Steel Products

      front size; 38 x 1 3/4 with 10 leaves (1939 had 9 leaves)

      Rear size; 58x 1 3/4 with 8 leaves

      1940 front size; 40 1/2 x 1 3/4 with 11 leaves

      1940 rear size; 53 x 1 3/4 with 9 leaves

Steering gear; Cam & double lever by Ross, caster 3 degrees, king pin

Inclination 7 1/2 degrees, toe-in l/8"

Brakes; Drum 11" diameter, lining length per wheel 23", width 1 3/4, thicknessl/4, clearance .006 heel .010 toe, total brake area is 161.0".

Hand brake lining; Length per drum 17 3/4 x 2 x 5/32", clearance 1/32"

Speedometer by Stewart Warner, gas & temp. Gauge by Kelsey Hayes.

Windshield wiper motor and transmission by Trico.

Shock absorber by Delco, direct acting

Safely glass by LOF

Lubrication; pressure positive, gear pump, oil pressure 45 @ 30 mph, pressure relief 50 Lbs. Oil pressure gauge by Kind Secley, Fram oil filter.

Fuel pump by AC

Carburetor; 1938 & 1939 11/2 down draft

      Non supercharged - Marvel C2

      Supercharged   - Marvel C3

Carburetor; 1940 Automatic heat control, air cleaner by Burgess

      Non supercharged - Carter WAl- 472S, 1 3/8

      Supercharged   - Carter WAl - 473S, 1 3/8

                                                                              

                 TEMPERATURE GUAGE

         King Seeley made the temperature gauge. The sending unit that is in the cylinder head is the same unit used in flat head Ford V8s in the '40s and early '50s. There are used units around but they were available from Ford obsolete sources.

        

              MARVEL SCHEIBLER CARBURETOR

         If you have trouble with your carburetor and it can't be rebuilt or you want something that works, try an after market unit made by Tillotson. The model number is YR-2 and originally was boxed with several adapter arms and has a stub shaft that mates up with the Graham linkage. The adjustable main jet is adjusted to your car by turning it in until it seats and then turn it back out one and a half turns. Then start the car adjust the jet both ways until the engine starts running rough and then make the setting half way between the two positions.

        

              FUEL GAUGES

         The fuel gauge is made by King Seeley, and uses a different type of sender unit. The gauge has a bi-metal strip with resistance wire around it and as the current increases the heat increases and it bends the bi-metal strip causing the needle to move. The sender unit also uses a bi-metal strip with resistance wire around it. The float moves and applies pressure to a contact and heats the strip. The strip then moves away from the contact and when the strip cools down the contacts are again closed. The longer the time the contacts are apart the less voltage is sent to the gauge. Increasing or decreasing the voltage makes the gauge move. This sender unit is a vibrating unit rather then a variable resistance sender, and care must be used when checking for problems in the system.

              Trouble shooting the system

         First check to make sure the battery is hooked up with battery positive to the frame of the car, and battery negative is hooked to the starter. Then check for voltage at the fuel gauge. One post of the fuel gauge should have full battery voltage; the other side should have a different voltage reading. Check for voltage at the sender unit at the tank, and it should be the same as the reading taken on the post with the reading that was different than full battery voltage. If you don't have any voltage at the tank and you do at the gauge the wire is bad. If you have battery voltage coming to the gauge but not out of the gauge then the gauge is bad. If you have voltage at the tank and the gauge does not move try grounding the wire to the frame to see if the gauge moves. Caution; do not leave the wire hooked to the frame for very long, damage could occur to the gauge. If the gauge moves the sending unit is bad. Original units are hard to find, the King Seeley number for the '38 & '39 Graham is #6928 and for the '40 Graham is #7916. The '36 to '40 Ford used a similar setup and you can check with Bob Drake Ford Parts, 1819 N.W. Washington Blvd., Grants Pass, Oregon 97526, phone 1-800-221-3673. The float arm might have to be shortened, no guarantee it will work.